Weekly Newsletters | Good Governance Institute

Weekly Newsletters

Our six-week integrated care breakfast webinar series continued this Wednesday with a session looking at payment mechanisms as part of the design of integrated care systems (ICSs).

The challenge facing the NHS was starkly set out in a 2018 report from the HFMA and PWC, which included the following: “The way the NHS financial system currently works is simply not aligned with place or outcomes-based care. Today the care system and the way that money moves around it is in a messy no-man’s land with a chaotic and bewildering array of financial mechanisms in place.”

To find out what our guests think about how best to rise to this challenge, read this week’s blog post from Andrew Corbett-Nolan, our CEO, linked below.

Our guest speaker, Jacque Mallender, director, Economics by Design, has written a comprehensive bulletin based on her talk, which we think is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the complexity of integrated care.

Next Wednesday (25 November), our focus will move to the economics of population health. Our host will be Marie Gabriel, independent chair, East London ICS, and Jacque Mallender will once again open the session with her thoughts on the topic. As before, we’ve published a briefing document to guide the discussion.

We’re thoroughly enjoying this series and, judging by the feedback we’re receiving, we’re not the only ones. If you’d like to join the conversation, you’ll find the registration details here.

Our six-week integrated care breakfast webinar series got off to a great start on Wednesday this week, when more than 100 guests joined us to explore design principles for ICSs, ICPs and systems. This week’s event was billed as focusing on the theme of place, but the discussion ranged much further and wider than that – and was all the better for it. You can read more about this opening webinar in a blog post by Andrew Corbett-Nolan, our CEO, linked below. Next Wednesday (18 November), the conversation will be about driving value by the effective use of payment mechanisms in ICSs. The event will be hosted by Bob Alexander, Independent Chair, Sussex Health and Care Partnership ICS, with a presentation from Jacque Mallender, Director, Economics by Design. As before, we’ve published a briefing document to help guide the conversation. It promises to be another interesting discussion – if you’d like to be part of it, you’ll find the registration details here.

Our focus this week is on integrated care, a topic that’s been thrown into sharp relief by the COVID-19 pandemic, as it overloaded fledgling care networks and underlined the dangers of poor coordination. Next year the whole of England will be covered by integrated care systems (ICSs) but there remain significant challenges around governance, accountability and legislation. Rising to these challenges will require closer collaboration than ever between health, care and political leaders. To help foster that spirit of collaboration a new GGI webinar series begins next Wednesday, giving us all a chance to come together to explore design principles for ICSs, integrated care providers (ICPs) and systems. We’ve published a briefing paper for those attending the first webinar, which examines the importance of place. In it, we say: “Primary care is strengthened through PCNs working across practices and health and social care, and drawing on resource across community, voluntary and independent sectors, as well as other public services to play a proactive role in improving population health and prevention.” read the paper in full here. There’s still time to register your interest in joining the discussion – see below for more details. One of the big integration challenges is coping with ambiguity. Our senior consultant Peter Allanson writes in his blog post this week: “Surely a construct that brings together all the health and wellbeing partners in a location with local accountability is good. “That’s the theory, anyway. In practice, dealing with the issues means getting to grips with complexity, ambiguity, chaos and fuzzy, unclear outcomes. The choice of words is deliberate. There is no single roadmap.” The solution, says Peter, lies in good planning, aligned motivations and the bringing together of people from different perspectives. Read on to find out more.

The second wave of COVID-19 has well and truly broken. Last week saw the highest number of cases reported so far; hospital admissions and, tragically, deaths are rising across the globe. Earlier this week, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organisation, said: “This pandemic is far from over. We need to adjust all our efforts to be suitable for the long-run. Strong leadership integrated in a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach will help to sustain a consistent and robust response.” Tedros was right to emphasise the role of leaders. Effective, decisive leadership is more important than ever at this critical phase in our collective response to the pandemic, as political division grows, lockdown fatigue chips away at our resolve and the cracks start to appear in our united front. But for leadership to be effective, it must be inclusive and engaging as well as decisive. In this week’s blog, we stress the importance of visible leadership built on a foundation of complete transparency and authentic dialogue. This applies as much to every NHS board member as it does to heads of state.

Tuesday this week was World Statistics Day, an annual opportunity to celebrate the importance of the critical data we gather to support decision-making and public accountability.

We’ve previously addressed the prominent role played by statistics in the fight against COVID-19 – as well as their occasional misuse – and our appetite for the daily updates and trend graphs continues unabated. But we forget at our peril that behind the coronavirus numbers lie numerous human stories about tragedy and fortitude and bravery and loss. That’s why it is so important to balance the statistical evidence we all consume so avidly with testimony about those working at the frontline of the fight against COVID-19. And that is what makes our weekly webinar sessions with NHS non-executive directors so valuable. For it is during these conversations that we hear about the trauma of treating healthcare colleagues who have contracted the virus while helping others, about fears of burnout among frontline staff who have been battling the virus for months without respite, and about falling morale as the numbers of hospital admissions continue to grow and the prospect of a desperately challenging winter looms. Our blog this week, written by GGI’s Emma Williams and Sam Currie, captures one of those conversations. We think it’s essential reading for anyone working in health care management.

This week we invite you to climb aboard the GGI time machine for a journey through the ages with our 2020 Festival Review, which connects the narrative of this extraordinary year with various points in the past to find new ways of learning the lessons of history.

The 2020 Festival of Governance may be behind us but it’s possible to rewind once more and revisit some of its key themes in your own time, courtesy of GGTV Governance, GGI’s YouTube channel.

So much has been transformed this year. We have all had to reinvent the way we do many things and this has resulted in some unforeseen benefits. One of the best things to emerge from 2020 for GGI has been our weekly online peer-to-peer discussion groups, where senior NHS colleagues from all over the country come together to discuss the issues of the day. With this week marking the beginning of black history month, we’re grateful to Cedi Frederick, chair of North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, for leading today’s webinar discussion for NHS non-executive directors. The topic for the day was BAME NEDs – making a contribution or making a difference? The impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities was also the topic of yesterday’s Mental Health Network webinar discussion. Read on to learn more about what was said. Diversity and inclusion has been a recurring theme of 2020, fuelled in particular by the Black Lives Matter movement and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on people from BAME backgrounds. Today’s discussion follows our announcement last month of the launch of our new diversity and inclusion practice. This year we have also been proud to support the Seacole Group’s efforts to ensure that NHS boards reflect the ethnic diversity of patients and communities they serve.

On 22 September GGI held its first virtual annual lecture. Participants dressed in pink in solidarity with each other and anyone who’s been made to feel different. Expectations were set high, calling for Renaissance 2.0 2020. Rob Whiteman, Chief Executive of the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy delivered his lecture: “Who is responsible for what? Exploring the blurred lines between government, governance, the third sector and the public sector.” It prompted a lively discussion, chaired by Nadine Benjamin, which resulted in the participants considering a rethink of how we do democracy in the UK, asking what works and what doesn’t and considering how we can think again and reboot our constitution. A Renaissance 2.0 2020 and modern governance indeed!

We are inviting people on NHS and other public or third-sector boards to reimagine the future, bringing in Renaissance 2.0 for 2020 during our Festival of Governance: Good Governance because it’s time to think again. Last week was digital humanism week. This week we switched our focus to the idea of community interplay – how organisations work in local systems, the development of a digital state, community engagement and population health. The theme of the week ahead is modern governance – when we look forward to what we do next with our renewed perspective of good modern governance. On Tuesday 22 September the Festival’s main event takes place – our annual lecture. Chaired by Nadine Benjamin, this is a participatory virtual event revolving around a keynote speech by Rob Whiteman, Chief Executive of the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA). Rob will discuss “Who is responsible for what? Exploring the blurred lines between government, governance, the third sector and the public sector.”

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. We’re now halfway through our 2020 Festival of Governance. Over four weeks we are inviting people on NHS and other public or third-sector boards to reimagine the future, bringing in Renaissance 2.0 for 2020: Good Governance because it’s time to think again.

Last week was diversity week. This week our focus was on the idea of digital humanism – putting human thinking at the heart of digital decision-making and good governance. Steps Drama hosted an interactive session co-creating behaviours for better organisational digital implementation. The Perfect Ward app allows the user to decide on what data to collect to reduce harm and communicate better between wards and boards. Next week our theme is community interplay – how organisations work in local systems and of course community engagement and population health. We hope to see you at one of our virtual events.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. This week we launched our 2020 Festival of Governance, a four-week all-virtual event centred on the aim of rebooting public services in Renaissance 2.0 for 2020: Good Governance because it’s time to think again. This week we celebrated diversity. Allowing people to fully express themselves in the workplace, have their voices heard and their priorities taken into account makes for dynamic decision-making that is good for everyone in any organisation and for the communities that organisation is there to serve. Throughout the Festival we invite participants to join us in the GGI time machine, looking back to the Renaissance of the 15th and 16th Centuries to explore the driving forces behind this extraordinary period of transformation. Of course, we will also reflect on the events of the last few months and the impact of COVID-19 on public life in the UK today. Next week we explore the subject of digital humanism – putting human thinking at the heart of digital decision-making and good governance. We really value the organisations hosting festival events and moreover the participants who bring them to life. We look forward to seeing you at one of our virtual events soon.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. Next week sees the start of our 2020 Festival of Governance, a four-week all-virtual event centred on the aim of rebooting public services in a renaissance 2.0 for 2020: good governance because it’s time to think again. Throughout the Festival we invite participants to join us in the GGI time machine, looking back to the Renaissance of the 15th and 16th Centuries to explore the driving forces behind this extraordinary period of transformation. Of course, we will also reflect on the events of the last few months and the impact of COVID-19 on public life in the UK today.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. Last week we launched the four weekly themes for our thoroughly modern Festival of Governance and this week we’ve started to reveal some of the exciting interactive events we want to invite you to register for. Diversity in governance and leadership is essential. For the first week of the festival, we’re thinking about all of the protected characteristics and beyond to help ensure that every person is represented across all areas of the public sector and in the communities where we live. No matter your gender, race, religion, disability, sexuality, age – we want the world to be fair to all. In this newsletter you’ll see opportunities to discuss and engage in being an ally as well as the many different groups that help to create the UK today. Thank you for reading.

This was a big week at GGI, with our 100-bulletin series drawing to a close and the announcement of the four main themes of our 2020 Festival of Governance. Our bulletin series finished on a high, with a heartfelt piece written by GGI’s CEO Andrew Corbett-Nolan about the need for action during times of crisis. The biggest crimes at such moments in history are inactivity and indecision, he wrote. Earlier in the week we’d examined the lessons today’s boards might learn from the HIV/AIDS crisis, we’d asked if the NHS might be facing imminent legislative change, and we’d sung the praises of those who govern opera in the UK. Thank you for reading.

This week we look at the challenges employers face in shaping tomorrow’s workplaces now we’re all fans of homeworking and we ask if foundation trust boards are investing enough in their governors. In our regular look outside the health sector, we ask if charity trustees are taking effective scrutiny seriously enough, and we ask how boards can take some of the innovation and flexibility they discovered in lockdown and apply it to making environmental improvements. Finally, we ask, should boards trust millennials more? As ever, thank you for reading.

Our word of the week is ‘synergise’ – the benefits of which shone out of each of this week’s bulletins. From Monday’s reflections on the importance of leading with empathy to Friday’s guidance on communicating with clarity and authenticity, a common thread of collaboration and thoughtful interaction runs throughout. This week we also looked at the impact of COVID-19 on the world of sport and highlighted the excellent integration work being done in Dudley to deliver population health outcomes. As ever, thank you for reading.

‘Network’ is our word for the week and we touched on it in technical and figurative ways in our daily bulletins, which addressed COVID-19’s impact on the role of NHS CEO, the importance of patient engagement in times of crisis, and of sharing data flexibly and collaboratively. We also revisited the arts this week, discussing the future of the beleaguered performing arts sector with the CEO of the Independent Theatre Council, and we dared to peer into the abyss of NHS finances. A link to the calendar highlighting previous bulletins and considering future ones is included here. Thank you for reading.

Our word for this week is ‘reimagine’. It’s a theme we touched on in each of our daily bulletins, which covered COVID-19’s impact on the NHS staffing crisis, the importance of addressing health inequalities, and a perceived shift from individualism towards more community spirit. We also advised boards to be creative as they plan for the future, and highlighted the need for NHS organisations to engage fully with their communities in all their granular glory. A link to the calendar highlighting previous bulletins and considering future ones is included here. As ever, thanks for reading.

Following last week’s theme of pivot, our word for this week is ‘together’. Our sixteenth week of daily bulletins began with a look at how triangulated assurance can help boards to stay on top of strategic objectives. Other topics this week included the relationship between good governance and regulation, considering the need for a ‘new deal’, some useful tips on meaningful benchmarking and, wrapping up our together theme, organisational buddying. We have just 24 more bulletins to go until we’ll have published 100 bulletins in 100 working days. A link to the calendar highlighting previous bulletins and considering future ones is included here. Thanks for reading.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. In our bulletin on Thursday this week, we explored the role of the NHS as a pivotal organisation. We believe the service has an opportunity to take a proactive stance in 2020, leveraging its considerable resources and emergent collaborative culture to contribute even more to the sustainable wellbeing of the communities it serves. This week we also looked at the meaning of stewardship, digital assurance, and ethics – and at what makes boards great. We also updated out festival programme and introduced the soon-to-open GGI Academy. Happy reading….

This week we looked at the world through the lens of collaboration. Collaboration between health and social care organisations is the ultimate direction of travel for NHS and other public or third sector boards. Our bulletins also explored collaboration between the private and public sectors, the need for housing associations to work closely with local authorities, and the importance of boards building relationships with the hardest to reach groups among the communities they serve.

This week we look at where we came from, where we are and where we are going. COVID-19 and the groundswell of anti-racism that followed George Floyd’s death have revealed some deep systemic issues in recent weeks. But change is possible. It’s hard to comprehend that the idea of racial harmony could be met with anything other than universal agreement, but the far-right demonstrations of the past week underline the fact that we really do need to keep repeating that black lives matter! In our bulletin series we reimagined the world of work, recovered risk management, celebrated community innovation, treasured the role of the COO and scrutinised systemic racism. GGI also announced the chair of this year’s annual lecture, published several blogs and hosted some important webinars. As ever, thank you for reading.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week is National Carers Week, which aims to highlight the challenges that paid and unpaid carers face while also recognising their vital contribution to society. In our daily bulletins we marked the occasion by asking what NHS boards can do to support the care sector. We also explored the potential long-term benefits of digital nursing, outlined how boards might benefit from reviewing their succession plans, and highlighted how good quality management might help COVID-19 innovations stick. Finally, we began a series of bulletins exploring how other sectors were able to innovate to move forward despite the impact of the coronavirus.

This week: the arts!

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week our focus has been on principles – and in particular on their supreme importance when familiar structures fall away in times of crisis and we are all forced to fall back on intuitive behaviours that must be informed by values and principles that we all agree on.

Our daily bulletins looked at the continued relevance of the Nolan Principles thanks to their focus on behaviours and culture rather than process. We highlighted the key role of human judgement and intuition in effective assurance, and we discussed the importance of honouring the relationship boards have with the public – both through authentic engagement strategies and by effectively addressing waiting lists, one of the many fast-growing issues created by COVID-19.

Finally, in Friday’s bulletin we expressed solidarity with black, Asian and minority ethnic NHS staff and patients as the debate continues about the disproportionate impact COVID-19 is having on these communities.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week we ventured into uncharted waters by hosting our Governance Summit not at Leeds Castle, which has been home to our Leaders’ Forum for the past six years, but online, where we were joined by leaders from across the public sector. Our daily bulletins covered the important role of audit committees and the future of health care estate. We also ask if COVID-19 might have a positive effect on strategic commissioning, and we heard from colleagues in the private sector about some of the challenges associated with getting Britain back to work.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary.

This is Mental Health Awareness Week. In our daily bulletins, we marked the occasion by exploring the concept of kindness. With estimates suggesting that up to 500,000 more people will experience mental health issues due to COVID-19, on Thursday we looked at the current state of severe mental illness in the UK and asked how it would be affected by the pandemic. And on Friday we offered some practical advice on being kind to ourselves at times of stress. We also considered the difficult role of NHS governors, offered our views on what board development should look like during the pandemic, and celebrated the important leadership role of chief nursing officers.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary.

As the UK government takes its first tentative steps out of lockdown, we consider the economic and health service considerations for NHS and other public sector boards. In our daily bulletins this week, we heard Professor Mervyn King’s take on the coronavirus crisis, we looked at how NHS boards can keep their audit committees relevant, and we examined how the important role of medical director is changing as we move into the recovery phase. We also considered how boards can engage meaningfully with citizens as they contemplate how to change the way they operate, and we heard from a private landlord of primary healthcare properties about how it’s using its property portfolio to support the fight against COVID-19.

Welcome to GGI’s latest weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week GGI began looking at the recovery phase of COVID-19. It is our position that the three pillars of a safe, successful recovery are testing, Health and Safety, and shielding vulnerable groups from the disease. Our daily bulletins this week updated advice on virtual board meetings, we provided practical advice to facilitate testing at scale, and considered the Health and Safety of non-clinical staff. We also voiced concern about the increased risk of COVID-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic people and considered mitigating measures to shield vulnerable groups from the infection.

Welcome to GGI’s weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

Today we hosted a virtual meeting for NHS non-executive directors and chairs on the safety of black and ethnic minority staff during the coronavirus crisis. This week our daily bulletins spoke to the relationship between the chair and CEO, digital adoption, finance committees, the importance of NHS leaders using the right language during the COVID-19 recovery phase and the need for boards to think about their strategic priorities and the risk environment ahead. We also published a board assurance prompt for boards to assess risk now before we go forward.

Welcome to GGI’s weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week, we welcome back Darren Grayson from a secondment to the NHS, and we celebrate the addition of Dr Usman Khan to the GGI team. Topics covered in our COVID-19 briefings included what quality, ethics and people committees should be considering during and after the pandemic. We provide practical advice for NHS boards responsible for safeguarding the physical and mental health of their workers while making difficult decisions on behalf of patients. We also looked at what only the chair can do during this difficult time. Finally, we have an update on EHMA and ISQua.

Welcome to GGI’s weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week, our COVID-19 briefings covered the importance of flexible leadership, the duty of boards to keep an eye on the longer term while the situation develops, stewardship, and the key role of good governance to secure the future of organisations, beyond the immediate treatment of COVID-19 patients. Our guest bulletin this week is from Connect Health, a provider of MSK services, about how it scaled up its operations to meet the increasing demand from health workers for musculoskeletal (MSK) services.

 

Welcome to GGI’s weekly summary of briefings, knowledge-sharing and commentary. 

This week our COVID-19 updates offered advice on situational governance in times of crisis, we provided food for thought about stakeholder engagement and business continuity and emergency planning, and we invited a cybersecurity specialist to offer advice to help protect the NHS from online crime at this crucial time. We also offer a few words from the newest member of the GGI team, Adam Sewell-Jones, and update you on GGI’s transformational plans – as well as announcing the first details of our annual Festival of Governance.

Welcome to the Good Governance Institute newsletter, a new weekly digest of announcements, knowledge-sharing and other information from GGI. Daily Covid-19 updates. We also share some great news from the Black Country and there’s information about an upcoming virtual event for non-executive directors too.

At the end of an extraordinary first week of lockdown in the UK, we join the nation in thanking front-line health workers for their service. The work of NHS boards has never been more important and our efforts to support them continue.

This week we began a series of daily bulletins offering practical advice drawn from the deep experience gained by the GGI team over many years – and informed by the conversations we are having with NHS leaders throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

On Monday we make our advisory service for public sector boards free for the coming six months, offering further assistance to boards during this difficult time.